Temperature sensing t-shirt (AKA: “Yr in mah face!”)

'Yr in mah face' temp-sensing t-shirt

At last weekend’s 24-hour Pachube Hackathon, I created an electronic wearable I wasn’t expecting to make! To clarify that statement, I intended to hack on a LoL Shield I’d recently soldered together (it has 126 LEDs = steady hands needed & much love to the soldering iron ;-)). Unfortunately, I’d mislaid an accelerometer to interact with the LEDs, so it was no go for that hack…

Spaghetti croc clip testing works!

After spreading out all my spare LilyPad Arduino components and kit from my toolbox on the table at Pachube Hackathon, I decided on a new hack – a temperature sensing t-shirt! I spent some time writing and debugging the code before it would happily compile in the Arduino IDE. I then tested the code by uploading it to the LilyPad and connecting all the modules together with crocodile clips, and yay it worked!

Creating my hack: big heart cat heads

I’m very interested in interactive wearables and so decided to create a t-shirt that would use loop poll Celsius data from a sensor on the t-shirt and average them, then visualise the results. The tshirt uses sewable LilyPad Arduino modules and conductive thread to sew all the connections together.

I didn’t have much time left, once I’d got the code to compile and uploaded it, then tested everything together with the crocodile clips, so the designing, cutting out from fabric and sewing all the fabric and components together with conductive thread was a manic rush. No prizes for tidy sewing and elegant design I’m afraid, but a prototype conceived designed and built is less than 24 hours!

Creating my hack: big heart cat heads

So here’s the amusing concept scenario… imagine you’re a shy and retiring geek like me, who might find themselves in a social situation, such as a loud, crowded bar. The temperature sensing t-shirt I’m wearing has two cat heads: one green – the colour of cool, calm collected cat – its LED eyes signaling temperatures of less than 27 degrees Celsius, if the wearer were to say have someone at close proximity talking loudly at them, the heat from their breath would push the sensor Celsius average over this point and the LEDs would turn off on the cool calm collected green cat head and come on, on the hot, red, angry coloured cat head!

Creating my hack: early conductive thread sewing

This would be a signal to whomever is causing the angry red cat’s LEDs eyes to light up, to back off “You’re in mah face” or perhaps if the wearer is hot and embarrassed, to have a nice sit down in a corner with a cool drink of lemonade.

Creating my hack: woo done in the nick of time!

Creating my hack: back view, negotiating tracks of conductive thread

But seriously, my t-shirt is a fun proof of concept, I’m very interested in how sensing tech such as temperature sensors can have wider and useful usage. For example, in a society where more of the population is living to a ripe old age, then smart wearables such as temperature and other sensing modules can help older or disabled people, who might need their health monitoring constantly, carry on living at home for longer and keep their independence. Also, I can think of various lifestyle and sporting uses, such as comfortable sports clothes that would also have reasons to track data, plus smart clothing for people who work with extreme temperatures, chemicals or in harsh environments.

Me and my hack - yay it works!

36 responses to “Temperature sensing t-shirt (AKA: “Yr in mah face!”)

  1. how fancy is that!

  2. Sounds like there could be some interesting applications to that. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed.

  3. “Interactive wearables”–where have these been all my life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And congrats on FP. Hang on for the ride–it was a crazy one for me!
    Kathy

  4. Wow! You must be a genius ot something… kudos!

  5. Wow this sounds really interesting. I have to admit, I would love a shirt like that that could somehow sense a co-worker’s “annoying” factor and then stick it’s tongue out. LOL I’d never get anything done for my shirt flapping in the breeze. Congrats on being Freshly Pressed — this is a cool post, and it sounds like there could be interesting and potentially life saving applications for this.

  6. i love this! great idea!!!

  7. Awesome! Thanks for sharing. 🙂

  8. man,that is awesome🙂

  9. Wow. Quite a project for one day. I’m interested to see where this tech. goes.

  10. i need one.

  11. Wow. That’s crazy and cool.

  12. Awesome, just make sure not to spill anything on it, unless you made it washable!

  13. Let me guess, batteries not included? Actually you need to get that to market, I can see that actually sell.

    Blessings,

    Ava
    xox

  14. Smart clothing. I like that.

  15. so awesome. be careful if you go to the beach, wouldnt want you to get electrocuted.

  16. Hmm…Maybe if you linked it to a remote “at home alarm” you could market it to parents of teenage daughters as mandatory date attire.

  17. that is awesome, Realy like This🙂🙂🙂

  18. oo nice post and design i really like your post

  19. Hey Rain Rabbit! I was surprised to see you on the WordPress homepage when logging in. Congrats!

  20. pretty cool …or warm, I guess it depends🙂

  21. Wow, how clever are you!

  22. That’s crazy! In a very good way crazy! I really like how your mind thinks and how your hands work. If that’s you in the photos, you really don’t strike me as a shy retiring sort of person. Congrats on the FP!

  23. That’s pretty creative to produce interactive wear in under 24 hours. I do agree with Rufus this prototype could used as a base for several interesting applications.

  24. Nice going.
    I guess you don’t waste time, one after another, rolling on.

  25. What a creative work! I Like it.

  26. The first paragraph was all Japanese to me, but cool chest shield you made. Would be cool at Burning Man.

  27. Wowwwwww! New creation. Congrats for it!

  28. That is pretty freaking innovative and awesome! I would so buy one of those just so I can try it out at a loud and overly packed club. Haha

  29. This is one excellent thing. I think i should try some thing similar whenever i get some time. Thanks for sharing this. Such t-shirts with temperature (or other types) of sensor, or even interactive interfaces would be really cool.

  30. Dear everyone, thanks very much for your comments – they’re very encouraging!🙂

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