AnemoneStarHeart EEG / ECG visualising device at Transmission Symposium

AnemoneStarHeart handheld EEG/ECG Visualising Device

At the end of April I spent a very enjoyable day at Bournemouth University attending Transmission Symposium: Strategies for Brainwave Interpretation in the Arts. There were some very interesting presentations, exchanges of ideas and discussion on the intersection between art, cognition and technology. Links to the event, artists and scientists taking part can be found here. Thank you to Oliver Gingrich for inviting me to participate and to all the attendees, especially those who visited my emotive wearable exhibits, asked questions and/or tried a device and filled in a feedback survey.

At Transmission Symposium I debuted my AnemoneStarHeart, which is an ambient handheld device (smaller wearable version being tweaked!) I have developed for broadcasting, amplifying and visualising EEG and ECG data. I have been developing this device as part of the iteration process of the EEG Visualising Pendant. It brings together technology and elements from my aforementioned EEG Visualising Pendant and Flutter ECG pendant hack.

Watching 'Canal Trip' on BBC4 with AnemoneStarHeart broadcasting / visualising EEG
AnemoneStarHeart being used as an ambient device to observe relaxation whilst watching ‘Canal Trip’ slow TV programme, BBC4, May 15.

It can be used, for example as an aid for meditation, relaxation and concentration, as well as for personal viewing or sharing physiological data in social situations with others. Data is sent to the AnemoneStarHeart via Bluetooth and it is a battery operated, standalone device. It can either be viewed in the palm of the hand or placed in a convenient area of a room – illuminating the space with coloured light. Whilst sensors are transmitting data to the device, it constantly visualises it, changing colour and brightness based on the data it receives. The smaller, wearable version hangs from a chain as a necklace or in the style of a pocket watch so it can be brought out, looked at, then put away again. As I am interested in the commercial possibilities of bespoke couture wearables and small editions of emotive devices, at some point I aspire to crowdfund this project.

AnemoneStarHeart lit up with live EEG data

As part of my PhD research, I have spent the best part of a year organising and running focus groups with potential users of emotive wearables and the EEG Visualising Pendant in London and Amsterdam. I have also conducted field trials in various social and work situations across London and Brighton, plus collected feedback from observers of the pendant. Since the beginning of 2015 I have been analysing the resulting data. This is to discover the preferences and feedback of potential wearers of emotive wearables as well as the EEG Visualising Pendant. Out of the resulting data, so far, has evolved the AnemoneStarHeart device, for which I devised a new configuration of electronic components and code. I created a new enclosure for the electronics in 3D modelling package Rhino, with help from skills learned at Francis Bitonti’s computational design workshop. It was selective laser sintered (SLS) in Nylon, in one of D2W’s EOS machines in London.

Rain & AnemoneStarHeart lit up with live EEG data

At the moment I am mostly out of general circulation as I’m collecting and analysing data which is feeding into the new emotive wearable devices I am building, whilst simultaneously endeavoring to write up / finish my PhD thesis to deadline.

Francis Bitonti’s New Skins Workshop 2015 at Digits2Widgets, London

Containers of work to be opened!

After staying in writing over Xmas and New Year, I was very excited to escape the confines of my desk to join Francis Bitonti’s New Skins Workshop on computational design for textiles, for two weeks at Digits2Widgets 3D printing bureau in Camden.

The workshops consisted of alternating tutorials on techniques for creating 3D textile meshes in Autodesk Maya and Rhino 3D software, and also writing Processing sketches for 3D graphics. The workshops were taught by Francis Bitonti and Arthur Azoulai.

Tom modelling textures on the body in Rhino 3D
Tom’s work on wrapping mesh to make a shirt around a body.

Our first week started off by creating meshes for the body in skirt and shirt like forms in Rhino 3D. We then experimented with various mesh techniques to apply varied distributions of extruded geometric shapes on to a mesh. Going on to concentrate on creating interlocking aspects of a circle, we created a repeated template that could be used to create chainmail in Rhino 3D.

Magdalena making chain mail in Rhino
Magdalena making chain mail for textiles in Rhino 3D.

In Maya we played with primitive polygon shapes and then experimented with them in the animation timeline to flip and tween between shapes, which we could then start to turn into mesh textiles by joining them together.

New Skins Workshop montage
L-R work by Victoria, Ezmeralda, Tom and Ioana.

After discussing our ideas and designs for what we would like to individually create, we spent a couple of days building our own meshes. Every .STL file was checked over and fixed in Materialise’s very useful app, Magics (which I wish I could afford for future work!), before sending to the SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) machine to be turned into real objects via the magic of a laser zapping powdered nylon.

New Skins Workshop montage
L-R work by Nada, Magdalena, me and Carmen.

Whilst the objects in the machine were being turned around, which takes several hours as the cubicle inside the machine stacks up several files / containers of work to be processed at a time, we did some examples of Processing sketches to create 3D graphics. We also learned about other software packages such as ZBrush, which is a powerful 3D sculpturing tool for manipulating 3D objects and looks like amazing fun to play with.

Two heart shapes for a locket to contain electronics
My design shaping up in Rhino 3D.

AnemoneStarsHeart pieces
The container with my heart halves inside just opened by Johnathan!

Of course the most exciting part of the two-weeks was receiving the containers from the SLS machine, with the fruits of our creativity neatly concealed inside! I created a heart-shaped shell enclosure /pendant with a repeated star mesh to create an anemone-like effect. This was created to house the electronics and act as a diffuser of data in the form of coloured light for the next iteration of my EEG Visualising Pendant. The pendant amplifies and visualises attention and meditation EEG data from the wearer via a NeuroSky EEG headset.

AnemoneStarsHeart heart lit up with live EEG data
AnemoneStarsHeart lit up with live EEG data from my brainz!

Rain & AnemoneStarsHeart heart lit up with live EEG data
AnemoneStarsHeart lit up with live EEG data via Bluetooth NeuroSky MindWave headset.

Many thanks to Francis, Arthur, Jonathan and the staff at D2W for a great two weeks of fun and excellent hospitality, plus not forgetting the lovely attendees of the workshop who were fab to hang out with.

Baroesque Barometric Skirt in New Scientist & on show at Microsoft Research, Redmond, USA

As we trundle into the dark winter days of 2014, I will be locking myself away to write, so I won’t be traveling to show my work in any exciting cities for a while.

So, just a couple of nuggets of recent news on my Baroesque Barometric Skirt – I was delighted to hear that it had been featured in the ‘One Per Cent’ column in New Scientist Magazine, September 27th issue, which reported on it being shown at the ISWC (International Symposium on Wearable Computing) Design Exhibition at the EMP Museum in Seattle last September.

My Barometric Skirt in New Scientist, in Mayday Hosp shop
The Baroesque Barometric Skirt featured in New Scientist

Rain & New Scientist, which contains pic & mention of Baroesque Barometric Skirt
Me being chuffed in Smiths with a copy of New Scientist

The Baroesque Barometric Skirt was also on display at Microsoft Research Gallery during September and October, which was organised by Asta Roseway of Microsoft Research and Troy Natchtigall, chair of the ISWC Design Exhibition. The skirt, which is part of my PhD practice should be winging its way back to me soon and I’m looking forward to being reunited with it.

ISWC Design Exhibition at Microsoft Research Gallery, Redmond, WA, USA
Baroesque Barometric Skirt exhibited at the Microsoft Research Gallery in Redmond, WA, USA. Image by kind permission of James Hallam of Georgia Tech, whose Ballet Hero garment is also featured in this photo.

ISWC Design Exhibition at Microsoft Research Gallery, Redmond, WA, USA

Some of the other exhibits on show at Microsoft Research Gallery. Images by kind permission of James Hallam.

ISWC Design Exhibition at Microsoft Research Gallery, Redmond, WA, USA

Whilst in Seattle at ISWC, I took advantage of the interesting decor of the Motif Hotel to make a new video of the skirt. Many thanks to Johnny Farringdon for being my cameraman :-)

World Maker Faire 2014, New York Science Park

World Maker Faire
Yay, arrived at New York Maker Faire :-)

I was really excited to be in NYC in September to attend and do a presentation on my wearables work at my first US Maker Faire. Having exhibited at four UK Maker Faires in Newcastle, plus Brighton Mini Maker Faire and visiting both Elephant and Castle Maker Faires (where at the most recent I wandered about soliciting feedback on my EEG Visualising Pendant), I was full of anticipation for the World Maker Faire weekender at the New York Hall of Science, in Queens, New York.

Maker Faire
World Maker Faire is totally vast!

I had heard it would be big, but I wasn’t prepared for the hugeness of it, or that it would mainly be an outside event! It was comprised of several fields of stands and presentation stages, plus the entirety of the New York Hall of Science, which isn’t a small building. Because I had a big list of places I wanted to visit in Manhattan, I had intended to spend half a day on Saturday and Sunday at Maker Faire, but due to the vastness of World Maker Faire I spent two whole days there till closing each day and I still didn’t see everything or meet up with or find all the friends I had intended to say hello to.

Maker Faire is large!
Map of hugeness of World Maker Faire!

On day two (Sunday), on the Electronics Stage, I gave a presentation on my own work, primarily my Baroesque Barometric Skirt and EEG Visualising Pendant, which I wore around World Maker Faire, that incited much curiosity and feedback – which was a fun way to meet people! It was lovely that friends were in the audience and afterwards we had much fun wandering about and catching up. The talk slot was a bit short for me as I usually have a lot to say, so I had to wind up before my slides ran out, but I enjoyed the opportunity immensely.

Presenting on visualising physiological data
Me, presenting my wearable technology work at the Electronics Stage

Ivaylo, Mandy, Ran & me
Was fabulous to catch up with and hang out with Ivaylo, Mandy and Ran, plus thank you for coming to my talk :-)

In terms of what was on show, it wasn’t very different from what I’d been used to seeing at UK Maker Faires, i.e. lots of electronics, crafts and technology stalls from individual makers, hackspaces and organisations, but there were loads more large stalls from the big players such as Atmel, Intel and Arduino.

Signpost
Just one of the signposts around World Maker Faire!

It was great that there were many presentation stages and a multitude of talks to choose from, my favourite talk of the weekend was by one of my favourite inspirational wearables creators and thinkers, Kate Hartman, who spoke about the work her students have been up to at OCAD University in Toronto. I went up to Kate at the end to say hello, which was lovely. Check out her conceptual wearables, they’re very cool and have a look at the Social Body Lab and projects, which she runs at OCAD.

Kate Hartman talk
I really enjoyed Kate Hartman’s presentation on wearables

There were too many great stands and projects to document, but one of my favourites was the glorious Sashimi Tabernacle Choir, consisting of a car covered with over two hundred and fifty computer controlled lobsters, bass, trout, catfish and sharks. The Choir performs a choreographed repertoire of songs from pop songs to classical opera. It’s fabulous – enjoy the videos and info on the website!

Very amusing Sashimi Tabernacle Choir
The wonderful Sashimi Tabernacle Choir

A highlight of World Maker Faire was finally finding the OpenBCI stand. I had been conversing with Conor via email about their modular sensing kits that they had recently successfully ran a Kickstarter campaign to fund. To emphasise the vastness of World Maker Faire, it had taken me two days to find them. After asking at multiple help points, studying the map and wandering around and around the fields, I finally found the OpenBCI on the last day by grabbing a kindly information stand helper, who on hearing my plight, wandered around with me to find their stand! I’m really glad I persevered, as it was lovely to meet Conor and Joel and fascinating to chat about and view their OpenBCI wares being demonstrated, plus they had a special discount offer for that weekend, which I took advantage of and can’t wait to get my own OpenBCI kit soon!

Conor & me
Great to finally meet Conor from OpenBCI

Another highlight of World Maker Faire was bumping into inspirational electronics engineer and entrepreneur Limor Fried AKA Ladyada, and Phil of Adafruit. I have been following Limor’s work since I got my first LilyPad Arduino back in 2008, which I bent her ear about and also showed her my EEG Visualising Pendant. When I got back to the UK I sent details of the pendant to Adafruit and fab fellow wearable creator, (whose work I’ve also followed for years) Becky Stern put up a page up about it on the Adafruit Wearable Wednesday blog – thanks Limor and Becky!

Limor Fried (Ladyada) & me
Yay, thanks Limor for allowing me to bend your ear on my EEG Visualising Pendant :-)

To sum up, World Maker Faire was huge, amazing and inspiring – I’d love to go again – thanks for having me!

Metrocard Man & Doge
Metrocard Man and Doge!

Mushy Daleks
Even at World Maker Faire there’s gotta be Daleks, especially knitted ones!

Giraffe
One has to say hello to the iconic Giraffe!

Strange and wonderful retro music makers
Strange and wonderful upcycled music machines

Drawing circuits
Ivaylo drawing a circuit with a conductive pen

Curreh vegan goat & other delacacies
Curry Vegan ‘Goat'(TVP) and other vegan delacacies were on offer!

Don't wear your EEG headset for too long!
This skellington is wearing their EEG headset wrongly!

OpenBCI stand
This skull is wearing their OpenBCI headset appropriately (I think)!

Posing with Make Robot
Posing with the Maker Faire Robot

International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC) 14 Design Exhibition at Experience Music Project Museum (EMP), Seattle, USA

Barometric Skirt

For me, the highlight of the ISWC / UbiComp conference was exhibiting my Baroesque Barometric Skirt in the ISWC Design Exhibition and conference reception. This year the ISWC Design Exhibition was held at the Experience Music Project Museum (EMP) in Seattle, which is an amazing venue with a three-storey screen on which videos of our work were shown and also houses a permanent exhibition dedicated to pop culture and music. Because I took so many photos (and made a video) I’m giving the event it’s own page so that it doesn’t take over my main ISWC blog post! This year I didn’t meet all the other exhibitors during the Design Exhibition set up, so I can’t do a full report on all the exhibits, but a full list of the Functional and Aesthetic wearables can be found on the ISWC program (Tues: EMP Reception/Design Exhibition link).

EMP
Experience Music Project Museum (EMP), Seattle, USA.

ISWC 2014 is my third year of being honoured to have my responsive and emotive wearable tech work accepted by the Design Exhibition jury: in 2012 I had three wearables accepted for ISWC held at Newcastle University, UK, and last year in 2013, my EEG Visualising Pendant was accepted for exhibiting at ISWC at ETH Zurich, Switzerland.

Baroesque Barometric Skirt

This year I was extremely happy to take my Baroesque Barometric Skirt to ISWC Seattle to exhibit. The skirt visualises data in the form of four independent RGB LED strips from four sensors, three of them are environmental and are: ambient temperature, pressure and altitude, the forth is a temperature sensor that sits on the inside of the skirt and pulls in the wearer’s body temperature. My motivation for creating the skirt is that I am interested in how we can display our physiological data alongside that of the environment or ‘bigger picture’ of elements that we are surrounded by. The skirt changes visually as the wearer moves around environments and also as the body reacts to its present situation. This garment-device starts a conversation around the connections between the environmental and physiological data of the wearer. The Baroesque Barometric skirt contributes a new way of sensing and presenting environmental and physiological data together. My paper on the skirt can be found in the conference proceedings and is available here or via ACM, but if you have any problems you can get a copy from me.

Welcome
Troy welcomes attendees to the Design Exhibition at the EMP.

Many thanks to Design Exhibition Chair Troy Nachtigall for heroic work on organising the whole shebang from submissions to the show at the amazing EMP Museum, which looked stunning and also to the jury: Maggie Orth, Rosa Asteway, Zoe Romano and Meg Grant and not forgetting the ISWC volunteers.

Links to my main post on ISWC and ISWC Doctoral School Colloquium.

Baroesque Barometric Skirt video on 3 storey video wall
My Baroesque Barometric Skirt video shown on EMP’s three-floor high video wall!

A selection of images of wearables from the Design Exhibition:

ISWC Design Exhibition
Innovative Explorations in Apparel Design to Create Engineered Outfits with Lighting Technologies by Eric Beaudette et al.

ISWC Design Exhibition
TWINY emotional logging by Sara Ferraro et al.

ISWC Design Exhibition
Ballet Hero: Building a Garment for Memetic Embodiment in Dance Learning by James Hallam & Emily Keen et al – winner of the Functional Design Award.

ISWC Design Exhibition
Flowers on a Pond – solar LED Dress by Anna Perry.

ISWC Design Exhibition
Digital Lace: A Collision of Responsive Technologies by Sarah Taylor and Sara Robertson – winner of the Aesthetic Design Award.

ISWC Design Exhibition
S.A.R.A. – synesthetic augmented reality application by Margarita Benitez, Markus Vogl.

ISWC Design Exhibition
Oiko-Nomic Threads by Marinos Koutsomichalis, Afroditi Psarra and Maria Varela.

ISWC Design Exhibition
‘TellMe': Therapeutic Clothing for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Daily Life (background) by Helen Koo.

Me & Baroesque Barometric Skirt
Me standing by my Baroesque Barometric Skirt and wearing my EEG Visualising Pendant.

18th International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC) + Pervasive & Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp), Seattle, USA.

HMD fashions ;-)

ISWC + UbiComp is my favourite international twinning of conferences: ISWC showcases some of the most exciting developments in wearable computing and because the papers are reviewed by great academics, the quality of the papers selected is, in my opinion, excellent. UbiComp is great too, because it also has a high standard of accepted papers, which cover many topics across pervasive and ubiquitous computing that crossover with wearable tech interests. The conference took place in the rather nice conference areas of the Motif Hotel in Seattle, USA, September 2014.

Amy Ross keynote on designing spacesuits for NASA

For me, the most compelling presentation of the conference was the keynote given by Amy Ross of NASA, which gave us a fascinating insight into the history of the evolution (to the present) of what goes into the design and creation of space suits. I really enjoyed all the details of what worked and didn’t, plus the fab examples she brought along such as wrist mirrors for looking at spacesuit components, gloves (which I tried on) and even an emergency handbook of advice for astronauts!

Emergency instructions for astronauts -Amy Ross keynote on designing spacesuits at NASA

Me wearing spacesuit gloves - Amy Ross keynote on designing spacesuits at NASA

Astronauts mirror for looking at spacesuit items - Amy Ross keynote on designing spacesuits at NASA

A session that I particularly enjoyed was on assistive technology and included presentations on Passive Haptic Learning of Braille Typing by Caitlyn Seim, John Chandler, Kayla DesPortes, Siddharth Dhingra, Miru Park, Thad Starner, and Assistive EyeWear Prototype that interactively converts 3D Object Locations into Spatial Audio by Titus J. J. Tang, Wai Ho Li. Another interesting session on human behaviour included talks on Privacy Behaviors of Lifeloggers using Wearable Cameras by Roberto Hoyle, Robert Templeman, Steven Armes, Denise Anthony, David Crandall, Apu Kapadia and Connecting Personal-scale Sensing and Networked Community Behavior to Infer Human Activities by Nicholas D Lane, Li Pengyu, Lin Zhou, Feng Zhao.

There are short summaries of all the sessions on the ISWC website, where you can find the whole program or proceedings can be downloaded from ACM though this might incur a fee. Also worth a look through is the list of demos and posters – where I exhibited a poster for my PhD research and demo-ed my EEG Visualising Pendant.

An interesting addition to this year’s ISWC/UbiComp was the experimental addition of a number of telepresence robots for those wishing to attend but could not physically get to Seattle. I found the robots really intriguing to watch as they weaved around the conference rooms and people stopped to chat to their controllers. These were a good addition to the conference in my opinion and I was pleased to see at least one robot personalised with a scarf. As I won’t be able to afford to attend next year’s conference in Osaka, Japan, I will definitely be applying for one of the robots if they’re used again!

Interaction with telepresence robots has been fascinating

Telepresence attendees

During the conference there was a Seattle Quantified Self + ISWC + Ubicomp meet-up, which was great as I got to show my EEG Visualising Pendant to a new audience and meet some lovely and interesting people, including David Cooper, who organises the Seattle QS meet-ups and had coincidentally brought his Muse EEG headset along, which was nicely fortuitous as I was waiting for my Muse to be delivered at home and was eager to chat about the device. David also pointed me towards some interesting Github repositories to investigate.

David &t his Muse EEG headband at Seattle + ISWC + Ubicomp Quantified Self meetup

ISWC Doctoral School Colloqium at 18th International Symposium on Wearable Computers (ISWC) / Ubicomp, Seattle, USA

Last month I attended ISWC (International Symposium on Wearable Computers) / Ubicomp (Ubiquitous Computing) in Seattle, USA. I was honoured to be selected to take part in the ISWC Doctoral School Colloquium as it attracts excellent students from around the world in the field of wearable computing, as does the Ubicomp DS for ubiquitous computing researchers. I hadn’t attended a Doctoral School before, so was really excited to take part and hear about the work of others, plus get some feedback on my own research. The Doctoral School began with both ISWC and Ubicomp students getting together bright and early at 08:30 for introductions, I’d hardly had any sleep or rather had been awake from 12am Seattle time as I was so jet lagged and doolally from the 10-hour flight from London, so was stumbling around a little. After the introductions, we had a keynote on the life of a research student from Professor Shwetak N. Patel of the University of Washington, then split off into two groups for ISWC and Ubicomp. There were many varied and interesting research projects and each student gave a 10-minute PowerPoint presentation on their work, followed by feedback from the academic panel and peers.

ISWC Doctoral Skool

For my presentation, I discussed how my research investigates the possibility that wearable technology can be used to create new forms of non-verbal communication via physiological data, my thesis focusing on the following issues:

  • Responsive & Emotive wearables + my practice
  • Data / privacy
  • Relationships – the personal, social and cultural
  • Requirements – who is this tech for?
  • What the technology might it be!
  • Aesthetics / design considerations / UX
  • The maker & the market in bespoke wearables

Presenting at the Doctoral Colloquium

I gave a summary of my methods and methodologies, including focus groups, surveys and field trials. Also how I will disseminate the data via thematic analysis: emphasizes pinpointing, examining and recording patterns or themes within data (qualitative) & statistical analysis from surveys (quantitative). I concluded with possible contributions to the field.

This was followed up with some interesting and useful feedback and discussion on various aspects of my research with the academic panel and peers, on areas such as framing and narrowing down questions and problem solving. We also discussed the accuracy of current technology being used for sensing physiological data and its value to the user. The Doctoral School was an amazing opportunity to start conversations and get feedback on my research, which continued through the duration of the conference.

The Doctoral School concluded with Q&A session with all the academic panelists to discuss issues around making the decision between following a career in academia and industry. This brought up many interesting questions and comparisons, around themes such as long distance relationships, workloads and working abroad.

Presenting my poster on my PhD research at ISWC

All Doctoral School students also presented their work as part of the Posters and Demos Reception, a list of which can be found here I exhibited a poster and demo-ed my EEG Visualising Pendant, which attracted a lot of interest and questions from attendees of both ISWC and Ubicomp.

The Doctoral School was an excellent experience – for getting feedback on one’s research from academics and peers, hearing about what others around the globe were interested in and researching, plus meeting and making new friends – so totally worth the 10-hour flight and disorientating jet-lag!

Evening Frolik

Up the Space Needle with Jocelyn & Tamara